Home News The Navarra frigate returns to Spain after participating in NATO’s largest anti-submarine warfare exercise

The Navarra frigate returns to Spain after participating in NATO’s largest anti-submarine warfare exercise

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The Navarra frigate returns to Spain after participating in NATO’s largest anti-submarine warfare exercise

The Spanish frigate Navarra is already returning to Spain after participating in NATO’s Dynamic Manta 2024 exercise, which prepares submarine crews to respond and adapt to any type of threat below the surface. It has been the largest and most complex submarine exercise in the Mediterranean, training, demonstrating and honing Allied capabilities in this particular type of warfare.

As NATO’s most advanced anti-submarine warfare (ASW) exercise, eight countries of the Atlantic Alliance have participated in its development with state-of-the-art submarines and cutting-edge technologies. This demanding exercise has been carried out simultaneously with NATO’s largest exercise, Steadfast Defender, with the aim of demonstrating the Alliance’s ability to carry out simultaneous exercises and missions throughout the Euro-Atlantic area.

Anti-submarine warfare is a team effort, with each platform bringing its unique capability, and these exercises allow allied countries and their teams to improve their skills and work on new tactics while improving interoperability and teamwork.

The goal of Dynamic Manta has been to provide all participants with complex and challenging warfare training to improve interoperability and proficiency in anti-submarine and anti-surface warfare skills. Each participating unit has had the opportunity to conduct a variety of underwater warfare operations. The submersibles have taken turns hunting and being hunted, closely coordinating their efforts with air and surface participants.

For the second time since the exercise began in 2013, submarine assets have also worked with allied maritime Special Operations Forces (SOF), consolidating interoperability. The ability of allied SOF teams to cooperate with allied submarines from different nations represents a force multiplier for NATO.

Planned by NATO Allied Maritime Command (MARCOM), the exercise has been carried out off the eastern and southern coasts of Sicily. The participating submarines belong to the navies of Greece, France, Italy, Spain and Turkey, and the NATO Submarine Command (COMSUBNATO) has exercised operational control over several, as required by the exercise scenario.

Maritime patrol aircraft (MPA) from Canada, Germany, Greece, Turkey, the United Kingdom and the United States and maritime patrol helicopters (MPH) from Italy have also participated, supported by the surface ships of NATO’s Permanent Maritime Group Two ( SNMG2), commanded by Italian Navy Rear Admiral Pasquale Esposito.

As the host nation, Italy provides support at the ports of Catania and Augusta, the naval helicopter base in Catania, the Sigonella Naval Air Station, as well as support from the Augusta Naval Base.

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