Home News The discredit of Congress as a legacy

The discredit of Congress as a legacy

0
The discredit of Congress as a legacy

S├ínchez and Puigdemont’s amnesty law is on its way to becoming Atila’s new horse. Nothing will grow where it passes and will corrupt everything it touches. Such is the degree of toxicity and malignancy of the legal monstrosity agreed upon for the immunity of the two co-authors. A guarantee of impunity for both of them against what could happen. The damage to all constitutional and institutional orders, in addition to image, reputation and credit, will be extraordinary. They already are, to a good extent, but nothing comparable to if the erasure of the crimes of the process finally materializes. The reasons why this future will never arrive are, therefore, overwhelming and equally demand exceptional efforts in all areas and by all means that the laws enable. The Popular Party is in that line, and its speech and actions, although at times they may seem parsimonious to a certain extent, respond to the planned objectives and describe a strategy and an offensive without any respite until the objectives are successfully achieved. The institutional conflict of powers posed by the Senate to Congress against the proposed amnesty law on the grounds that it violates the Constitution has been a surprising maneuver. It has represented an act of parliamentary force that, whatever its efficiency, proves that the opposition neither resigns nor submits to the fraud and corruption of the Government and its partners, which is the behavior required of a force committed to the Constitution and the general interest. The litigation, for the moment, has generated tension and controversy in the Executive and in the bloc that has the Lower House tied up, with a presidency that prefers to muzzle its prestigious body of lawyers so that only the voice of its loyal secretary general Fernando resonates. Galindo, and a vice president Montero who withdraws national sovereignty from the people and assigns it to Congress, that is, to Moncloa. The shock of a good number of lawyers in the Lower House in the first stages of the processing of this illegal general pardon for coup plotters and corrupt separatists could have been only the preamble of what happens when the dispute with the Senate once again puts the table the attack against legality, coexistence and harmony by seven votes which is the amnesty. Then they will have the opportunity to take sides in conscience and law and break the law of silence of Armengol and his followers. The degradation of Parliament has reached unimaginable levels under the rule of this Executive, transformed into an instrument of its arbitrariness. It is another bitter legacy of that scorched earth policy so common to democratic authoritarianism. For this reason, the institutional conflict between Chambers will strengthen the process that must end with the amnesty in higher judicial instances whether in Spain or in Europe, an unappealable final outcome for justice and freedom to prevail.

source